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(Updated on 11 June 2015) List 4 of common Indonesian words that are completely different from Malay has been added as well as 10 more sentences for translation practice from English to Indonesian.

1. Go here for an article in Indonesian to see how similar it is to Malay.
2. Common Indonesian words that are completely different from Malay (List 1-4)
3. Differences in spelling between Malay and Indonesian words
4. Country names in Indonesian and Malay
5. English words in Indonesian
6. Sentences to translate into Indonesian
7. Acronyms in Indonesian words

 Learn Indonesian with Malay © pgoh13 

How is it possible to study Indonesian with Malay? Well, it is possible because they are practically the same language! So when you study the 64 lessons of the Basic Malay Language course here it is just like you are learning the Indonesian language. Except, yes except for the few differences that are brought up here in relation to each of the lessons in the Malay language course. Plus the many tables that I have compiled to make it easier for you to cross over from Malay to Indonesian. Isn't that fantastic?
So let's start your study of Indonesian by going to Lesson 1 of the Basic Malay Language Course here. At the end of each lesson you will see a table highlighting the differences between Malay and Indonesian. Just take note of these differences and as you continue with the other lessons in the course you will be on your way to studying Indonesian as well. To facilitate the study of Indonesian by those who have already completed the Basic Malay Language Course I have put all the tables together here for easy reference. But please bear in mind that they are not at all meant to be studied by themselves without first having gone through the specific lessons to which they refer. This is not how this page is intended to be used.
Please bear in mind also that in certain cases there is no real distinction between the Malaysian and Indonesian languages. In fact it is reported that there are over two million Indonesian workers in Malaysia* (the majority working as housemaids, others are employed in the agriculture, construction or manufacturing sectors), most of whom don't speak English. This naturally results in the adoption (and absorption) of many Indonesian words into the Malay language. In fact there is often no real line of demarcation between what is considered to be an Indonesian word and what is a Malay word. Thus both aku and saya are equally used for "I" in the two countries though Indonesia tends to use aku more than saya. It is for this reason that I often use aku in the Indonesian column and saya in the Malay column.
But there are other words that are exclusively used in one country and not in the other or do not have the same signification in Malaysia as they have in Indonesia. Take the word duduk as an example. In Malaysia the word can mean "live, stay" eg. You can ask someone Encik duduk di mana? and he is likely to tell you where he lives but if you were to ask the same question to an Indonesian who is seated in his office Bapak duduk di mana? he will be completely puzzled because in Indonesia the word duduk can only mean "sit" (although it also has this meaning in Malaysia). His reaction would probably be (thinking to himself): You must be crazy. Why are you asking me this? I'm sitting on a chair - of course!
So unless you want to be considered an orang gila (mad person, gila is pronounced as ghee-la) remember this when you are in Indonesia! Use the word tinggal instead as it has the same meaning in both countries. So Encik tinggal di mana? in Malaysia and Bapak tinggal di mana? in Indonesia.
Another striking difference is that if someone were to say Terima kasih (Thank you) to you in Malaysia, you would answer with Sama-sama whereas in Indonesia you would say Terima kasih kembali or simply Kembali.
There is one word frequently used in Indonesia though which could make your face turn red with embarrassment in Malaysia if you should use it wrongly so watch out. The word is butuh and it means "to need" in Indonesia eg. Saya butuh pertolongan anda (= I need your help) while in Malaysia the word butuh means a man's private part! In Malaysia you have to use the word perlu instead so the same sentence would be Saya perlu pertolongan anda. Oh by the way a word which is as frequently used as pertolongan in both countries is bantuan, also meaning "help" or "assistance". Good to remember in case you come across it.
Another word you have to watch out for is punggung which in Indonesia means your back so "I have a backache" would be Saya sakit punggung whereas in Malaysia it means your buttocks!
Then there is kaki lima which means a pavement or sidewalk in Malaysia but is used to describe an itinerant food hawker in Indonesia.
A word about pronunciation: Don't worry too much about the pronunciation as you will be understood if you speak Malay in Indonesia. Of course there are different Indonesian accents, much of which is the result of influence by the numerous regional dialects, but if you should speak basic Malay, you will be understood without any problem.
* Article in The Jakarta Post dated 7 May, 2012.

This page contains all the tables mentioning the differences between the Malaysian and Indonesian languages from the Basic Malay Language Course of 64 lessons. (From the top menu go to Languages then Malaysian and Indonesian Languages.) They will give you an idea on how this Basic Malay language course is adapted for those who want to study Indonesian. The tables below are NOT meant to be studied by themselves. You will never learn Indonesian this way! Good luck. - Webmaster


Lesson 1 of Basic Malay Language Course.
Quite often there is a slight difference in spelling between Malaysian and Indonesian words, particularly in words containing double consonants. If my memory serves me right Malaysian linguists at some time in the past rejected the use of double consonants, insisting that there should always be a vowel between them. As a result while the Indonesian spelling is Inggris, the Malaysian spelling is Inggeris. The same is true for istri (isteri in Malaysia) and Spanyol (Sepanyol in Malaysia). This is due to the difficulty for some Malaysians to pronounce two consonants together. However if this is not a problem for you, you can always pronounce Inggeris or isteri not in 3 syllables but in two (the way it is spelt in Indonesian).
Please bear in mind that what you hear in Indonesia might not always be standard Indonesian but rather one of the numerous dialects (Javanese, Sundanese, Madurese, Minangkabau, Bugis, Acehnese, Balinese, Batak, etc.)

ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
friend teman kawan
He/She is my friend. Dia teman saya. Dia kawan saya.
his friend or her friend temannya kawannya
all of you kalian, anda sekalian kamu semuanya
Addressing a man (politely) Bapak or Pak Tuan or Encik
Addressing a woman (politely) Ibu or Bu, Tante Puan
Addressing a young male person of your age or slightly older Mas Saudara, Abang
Addressing a young female person of your age or slightly older Nona, Mbak (embak) Saudari, Cik, Kakak
Addressing a child of either sex Dik Adik/Dik


Lesson 2 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
to speak bicara (or bertutur) cakap
can bisa boleh
I can speak English. Aku bisa bicara bahasa Inggris Saya boleh cakap bahasa Inggeris.
wife istri isteri
car mobil kereta
man pria orang lelaki


Lesson 3 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
This is my car. Ini mobil saya. Ini kereta saya.
This is my wife. Ini istri saya. Ini isteri saya.


Lesson 4 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
United States of America Amerika Serikat Amerika Syarikat
Spanish Spanyol Sepanyol
Japan Jepang Jepun
Sweden Swedia Sweden
Swedish orang Swedia orang Sweden
England Inggris England
Italy Italia Itali
As you will notice there are not too many differences in the names of the countries mentioned in this lesson. However while Malay normally retains the English spelling of a country, Indonesian often changes the spelling a bit. Examples are: Skotlandia (Scotland in Malay) and Irlandia (Ireland in Malay). One country that you might not recognize is "Selandia Baru", which is Indonesian for New Zealand (Malay retains the English name).


Lesson 5 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
What is your telephone number? Apa nomor telepon anda? Apa nombor telefon kamu?
zero nol kosong
eight delapan lapan
We won by 3-0. Kami menang dengan tiga nol. Kami menang dengan tiga kosong.


Lesson 6 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
How many times did he phone? Berapa kali dia telepon? Berapa kali dia telefon?
All these cars have been sold. Semua mobil ini sudah dijual. Semua kereta ini sudah dijual.
Those people are waiting for the bus. Orang-orang itu tunggu bis. Orang-orang itu tunggu bas.
He has many friends. Dia ada banyak teman. Dia ada banyak kawan.


Lesson 7 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
Monday hari Senin hari Isnin
Thursday hari Kamis hari Khamis
Friday hari Jumat hari Jumaat
My wife always goes to market on Sundays. Istri saya selalu pergi ke pasar pada hari Minggu. Isteri saya selalu pergi ke pasar pada hari Minggu.
Happy birthday! Selamat ulang tahun! Selamat hari jadi!
festival day hari libur hari besar
He did not go to his office today because he is on sick leave. Dia tidak pergi ke kantornya hari ini karena cuti sakit. Dia tidak pergi ke pejabatnya hari ini kerana cuti sakit.
school holidays liburan sekolah cuti sekolah
I can speak Malay. Saya bisa berbicara Bahasa Melayu. Saya boleh bercakap Bahasa Melayu.


Lesson 8 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
number nomor nombor
zero nol kosong


Lesson 9 of Basic Malay Language Course.
If there is one aspect that varies greatly between the Malaysian and Indonesian languages it is in telling the time.
Firstly in Malaysia when we ask the time it is Pukul berapa? and the answer also starts with Pukul followed by the hour while in Indonesia they ask Jam berapa? with the answer starting with Jam followed not necessarily by the hour (eg. it can be Jam setengah followed by the hour).
Secondly the half-hour is completely different from what is said in Malaysia. Thus half-past seven would be Pukul tujuh setengah to Malaysians whereas the Indonesians would say Jam setengah lapan. Since we could miss an appointment completely by one hour or we might be one whole hour too early for an appointment it is very important that we get this right when we are in Indonesia. It is easy to understand that Jam setengah lapan means "half past seven" and not "half past eight" simply because setengah (meaning "half") comes BEFORE lapan (eight) so it must be half an hour BEFORE 8 o'clock and not after it. But as it is a bit difficult for English speakers to adapt to this way of thinking (ah, cultural differences do count in language learning!) it is perfectly all right for you, on your part, to say Jam tujuh tiga puluh minit if it's easier for you.
Thirdly while a quarter of an hour is suku in Bahasa Malaysia, it is seperempat (literally "one out of four parts") in Bahasa Indonesia. Both words mean "a quarter" of something. But if seperempat is too much of a mouthful for you, just say lima belas menit instead. It's clear, concise and you will not be misunderstood. Just as in English 10h15 can be either "a quarter past ten" or simply "ten fifteen" we can say Jam sepuluh lewat seperempat or Jam sepuluh lewat lima belas menit in Bahasa Indonesia and Pukul sepuluh suku or Pukul sepuluh lima belas minit in Malaysia.
Fourthly the use of the word lewat (sometimes the word lebih meaning "more" is used instead) in telling time in Indonesia. In Malaysia the word lewat is used in the sense of being late for an event and never used to tell the time as in Indonesia. The word lewat simply means "past" and is used up to the 29th minute past the hour. For English speakers when you hear the word lewat you can just ignore it, thus when you hear Jam sembilan lewat dua puluh lima menit just treat it as Jam sembilan dua puluh lima menit (nine twenty-five). Why complicate things when we can simplify them? So, to give another example, treat Jam lima lewat sembilan belas menit as Jam lima sembilan belas menit (five nineteen). This is just between the two of us, please don't try to correct the Indonesians! If you want to specify whether it is morning or evening, etc. you can add pagi, siang, sore or malam to it.
After the half hour you can use kurang to indicate the number of minutes short of the hour mentioned eg. 07h50 or 19h50 ("ten to eight" in English) is Pukul lapan kurang sepuluh minit in Malaysia and Jam delapan kurang sepuluh menit in Indonesia (literally "eight o'clock short of 10 minutes").
A word about punctuality. When you want to specify that an event starts precisely at a certain time the word to use is tepat (both in Malaysia and Indonesia). Thus Pukul dua tepat or Jam dua tepat means "2 o'clock sharp". In Indonesia (but not in Malaysia) they have a term to denote the opposite concept (i.e. when the time given is just an approximation and you are not required nor expected to be on time nor should you expect the other person to be punctual either). In this case they will use the term jam karet which is another way of saying "Let's play it cool, buddy. Let's take our own sweet time to arrive!"


ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
six o'clock in the evening jam enam sore pukul enam petang
What time is it now? Jam berapa sekarang? Pukul berapa sekarang?
ten minutes sepuluh menit sepuluh minit
police polisi polis
that bahwa bahawa
month of March bulan Maret bulan Mac
one quarter seperempat suku
a quarter past five (5h15) jam lima lewat seperempat pukul lima suku
at eight twenty (8h20) pada jam delapan lewat dua puluh pada pukul lapan dua puluh
nine forty-five (9h45) jam sepuluh kurang seperempat pukul sembilan tiga suku
half-past seven (7h30) jam setengah delapan pukul tujuh setengah


Lesson 10 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
March Maret Mac
June Juni Jun
July Juli Julai
August Agustus Ogos
December Desember Disember
The postcard which has just been received was dated 30 March 2014. Kartu pos yang baru saja diterima ini bertanggal 30 Maret 2014. Poskad yang baru saja diterima ini bertarikh 30 Mac 2014.


Lesson 11 of Basic Malay Language Course.
In the Indonesian language the two principal forms of salutation not used in Malaysia are Selamat siang and Selamat sore. The word siang means "daytime" (specifically late morning or early afternoon) while sore means "late in the afternoon". The word sore (pronounced so-ray) is never used by Malaysians (but might be eventually, who knows?)
As in Malaysia Selamat pagi and Selamat malam are equally used in Indonesia while instead of Selamat tengah hari the Indonesians would say Selamat siang. The following is a guide to the time of day when the above four types of greetings are used in Indonesia:
From about 4.00 a.m. to 10 a.m. Selamat pagi
From about 10.00 a.m. to 3 p.m. Selamat siang
From about 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Selamat sore
From about 6 p.m. to 4 a.m. Selamat malam
This is just a rough guide for foreigners. Hey, don't take it to the letter please (or should I rather say "Don't take it to the very minute please"?)

ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
How are you? Apa kabar? Apa khabar?
I'm fine. Baik-baik saja. Khabar baik.
See you later. Sampai jumpa or Sampai nanti. Jumpa lagi.
Excuse me (as when you have to pass between two people). Permisi. Maafkan saya.
grandfather kakek datuk
Merry Christmas Selamat Hari Natal Selamat Hari Krismas
Happy birthday! Selamat ulang tahun! Selamat hari jadi!


Lesson 12 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
orange (colour) oranye or jingga oren or jingga
orange (fruit) buah jeruk buah oren
Caucasian orang kulit putih orang putih
What is the colour of your car? Apa warna mobil anda? Apa warna kereta anda?
My car is blue. Mobil saya biru. Kereta saya biru.
card kartu kad
Zidane received a red card. Zidane mendapat kartu merah. Zidane mendapat kad merah.
Italy Italia Itali


Lesson 13 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
to marry kawin kahwin
elder brother kakak (kakak laki-laki) abang
elder sister kakak perempuan kakak
youngest child anak bungsu anak bongsu
That red car is his. Mobil yang merah itu dia punya. Kereta yang merah itu dia punya.


Lesson 14 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
He wants to buy my car. Dia hendak beli mobil aku. Dia hendak beli kereta saya.
I want to go to the airport. Saya hendak pergi ke bandara (= bandar udara). Saya hendak pergi ke lapangan terbang.
station stasiun stesen
I want to go to the railway station. Saya hendak pergi ke stasiun kereta api. Saya hendak pergi ke stesen kereta api.
office kantor pejabat
I want to go to the post office. Saya hendak pergi ke kantor pos. Saya hendak pergi ke pejabat pos.
money uang wang
He is unwilling to lend me some money. Dia enggan meminjamkan uang kepada aku. Dia enggan meminjamkan wang kepada saya.


Lesson 15 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
See you later! Sampai jumpa! Jumpa lagi!
I am going to call the police. Saya akan panggil polisi. Saya akan panggil polis.
weekend akhir pekan, akhir minggu hujung minggu
"pada pekan lalu" in Indonesian means "last week"


Lesson 16 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
doctor dokter doktor
If you are sick, go and see a doctor. Kalau sakit pergi jumpa dokter. Kalau sakit pergi jumpa doktor.
understand paham faham


Lesson 17 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
yesterday kemarin kelmarin
end ujung hujung
to marry kawin kahwin
next year tahun depan tahun hadapan
to invite mengundang menjemput
I would like to invite you to my house. Aku hendak mengundang anda ke rumahku. Saya hendak menjemput anda ke rumah saya.
happy senang gembira
to return home (to one's village) pulang kampung balik kampung


Lesson 18 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
You cannot smoke here. Anda tidak boleh isap rokok di sini. Anda tidak boleh hisap rokok di sini.


Lesson 19 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
meaning arti erti
any sembarang sebarang
free time, leisure waktu luang masa lapang
like to go window-shopping suka cuci-cuci mata di toko suka menengok-nengok barang di kedai
I like to go to the cinema. Aku suka pergi ke bioskop. Saya suka pergi ke panggung wayang.
return to one's hometown pulang kampung balik kampung
music musik muzik


Lesson 20 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
Please excuse me for arriving late. Maafkan aku karena datang lambat. Maafkan saya kerana datang lambat.
Excuse me, sir. What is the name of this road? Maafkan saya, Pak. Apa nama jalan ini? Maafkan saya, tuan. Apa nama jalan ini?
I don't understand. Aku tidak paham. Saya tidak faham.
Excuse me (when forcing your way) Permisi. Maaf.


Lesson 21 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
room kamar bilik
washroom kamar kecil, WC (pronounced way say) bilik air
shoes sepatu kasut
office kantor pejabat
post office kantor pos pejabat pos
bathroom kamar mandi bilik mandi
bag tas beg
bus-stop halte bis perhentian bas
airport bandara (bandara is the short form for "bandar udara") lapangan terbang
railway station stasiun kereta api stesen kereta api
Where is the bus-stop? Di mana halte bis? Di mana perhentian bas?
Where is the airport? Di mana bandara? Di mana lapangan terbang?
Where is the railway station? Di mana stasiun kereta api? Di mana stesen kereta api?
city kota bandar
Can I get a lift in your car to the city? Boleh saya tumpang mobil anda ke kota? Boleh saya tumpang kereta anda ke bandar?


Lesson 22 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
Yippee, there is no difference at all between Malay and Indonesian for numbers except that while Malay uses "lapan" for 8, Indonesia uses "delapan".
eight (8) delapan lapan
eighty (80) delapan puluh lapan puluh
eighteen (18) delapan belas lapan belas
billion milyar, miliar bilion


Lesson 23 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
My wife likes to eat prawns. Istri saya suka makan udang. Isteri saya suka makan udang.
We eat rice every day. (the "we exclusive") Kami makan nasi sehari-hari Kami makan nasi tiap-tiap hari.
beef daging sapi daging lembu
mutton daging biri-biri daging kambing
papaya pepaya betik
watermelon semangka tembikai
fried noodles mie goreng mi goreng
restaurant rumah makan kedai makanan
manggo mangga mempelam
lunch makan siang makan tengah hari
Although Indonesia has its own culinary delights (equally chilli-based), saté and rendang are as popular there as they are in Malaysia as well as the more down-to-earth nasi goreng (fried rice) and ikan goreng (fried fish). In case you are a foodnatic go here for some great Indonesian dishes.


Lesson 24 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
He drinks milk every morning. Dia minum susu setiap pagi. Dia minum susu tiap-tiap pagi.
wine minuman anggur wain
want mau mahu, mau
to chat mengobrol bersembang
shoe shop toko sepatu kedai kasut
I shall be going to the shoe shop tomorrow. Saya akan pergi ke toko sepatu esok. Saya akan pergi ke kedai kasut esok.
ice es ais


Lesson 25 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
passport paspor pasport
because karena kerana


Lesson 26 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
speak berbicara bercakap
pen pena pen


Lesson 27 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
postman tukang pos posmen
examination pemeriksaan peperiksaan


Lesson 28 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
friend teman kawan
bus bis bas
aeroplane pesawat terbang kapal terbang
He doesn't quite like taking a plane. Dia tidak berapa suka naik pesawat terbang. Dia tidak berapa suka naik kapal terbang.
petrol bensin petrol
The price of petrol has gone up. Harga bensin sudah naik. Harga petrol sudah naik.
taxi taksi teksi
I very rarely go to the dance-hall. Saya jarang sekali pergi ke ruang dansa. Saya jarang sekali pergi ke dewan tari-menari.


Lesson 29 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
clerk juru tulis kerani
Hello, Peter here. Who's calling? Halo, Peter di sini. Ini siapa? Helo, Peter di sini. Siapa itu?
Who is that man? Siapa pria itu? Siapa orang lelaki itu?
He is searching for his car keys. Dia sedang mencari kunci mobilnya. Dia sedang mencari kunci keretanya.
This is for my father. Ini untuk bapak saya. Ini untuk bapa saya.
elder brother kakak lelaki abang
elder sister kakak perempuan kakak
aunt tante, bibi emak saudara, mak cik
uncle paman, om, oom bapa saudara, pak cik
grandfather kakek datuk
nephew keponakan lelaki anak saudara lelaki
niece keponakan perempuan anak saudara perempuan
father-in-law mertua lelaki bapa mertua
mother-in-law mertua perempuan, ibu mertua ibu mertua
brother-in-law (older than you) kakak ipar lelaki abang ipar
sister-in-law (older) kakak ipar perempuan kakak ipar
step-father bapak tiri bapa tiri
While both anak lelaki (son) and anak perempuan (daughter) are also used in Indonesia, please note that putra (for son) and putri (for daughter) are also much used in Indonesia though the two words normally mean "prince" and "princess". From the above you can see that terms denoting family relationships are quite different depending on whether you are in Malaysia or Indonesia. However half of them are similar in both countries (all those terms that do not appear in this table).


Lesson 30 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
cold dingin sejuk
I'm cold. Aku kedinginan/Aku rasa dingin. Saya sejuk.
a cup cangkir cawan
Please give me a cup of coffee Tolong beri saya secangkir kopi Tolong beri saya secawan kopi
Caucasian orang kulit putih orang putih


Lesson 31 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
What are you doing? Anda sedang apa? Anda sedang buat apa?
When I entered his office he was reading a newspaper. Ketika aku masuk ke dalam kantornya dia sedang baca koran. Bila saya masuk ke dalam pejabatnya dia sedang baca surat khabar.


Lesson 32 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
elder brother kakak lelaki abang
badminton bulutangkis badminton
My elder brother likes to play badminton. Kakak lelaki saya suka main bulutangkis. Abang saya suka main badminton.
a film/movie film filem/wayang gambar
I love you. Aku mencintaimu. Saya cinta padamu.
girlfriend pacar perempuan teman wanita
I love my boyfriend. Saya cinta pacar lelaki saya Saya cinta teman lelaki saya.
marry kawin kahwin


Lesson 33 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
important penting mustahak
This is very important. Ini sangat penting. Ini sangat mustahak.
Note that "penting" is as much used as "mustahak" in Malaysia.


Lesson 34 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
Please sit. Silahkan duduk. Sila duduk.
Can I enter? Bisa saya masuk? Boleh saya masuk?
Please note that "Silahkan" is also spelt "Silakan" in Indonesian.
Please drink. Silahkan minum. Sila minum.
Please come to my house when you are free. Jemputlah ke rumah saya bila anda ada waktu. Sila datang ke rumah saya bila senang.
Please note that "senang" means "happy" in Indonesian while it means "free" (not busy) as well as "easy" (simple) in Malaysia. The word "gampang" is often used to mean "easy" (simple) in Indonesian while another word "mudah" is used in both countries to mean "easy".
Make yourself at home. Anggap saja di rumah sendiri. Buat seperti di rumah sendiri.
Can I borrow your pen for a moment? Dapatkah saya meminjam pena anda sebentar? Boleh saya pinjam pen anda sekejap?
Please don't worry too much trying to keep Indonesian and Malay apart. You will notice that the Indonesian and Malay sentences are quite often interchangeable and that there is no real line of demarcation between the two languages. It is just that one form might be more often used than another in Indonesia or in Malaysia, that's all there is to it.


Lesson 35 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
my son anak lelaki saya putera saya
My daughter is (already) married. Anak perempuan saya sudah kawin. Anak perempuan saya sudah kahwin.


Lesson 36 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
this morning tadi pagi pagi ini
last night tadi malam malam tadi
He was angry with me just now because I didn't help him. Dia marah dengan aku tadi karena aku tidak membantunya. Dia marah dengan saya tadi kerana saya tidak tolong dia.
He will be back soon. Dia akan kembali sebentar lagi. Dia akan balik sekejap lagi.
I'm tired. Saya capek. Saya penat.
At the risk of repeating myself please note that there is often no real line of demarcation between the two languages and that the Indonesian and Malay sentences in my examples above are often interchangeable. So if a word is put under Indonesian or Malay it does not mean that that word is not also used in the other country. It simply means that that word is more popularly used in one country than in the other, that's all.


Lesson 37 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
I don't understand. Saya tidak mengerti. Saya tidak faham.
understand mengerti/paham faham
It doesn't matter. Tidak apa-apa. Tidak apa.
He has no money. Dia tidak ada uang. Dia tidak ada wang.
My office is not far from here. Kantor saya tidak jauh dari sini. Pejabat saya tidak jauh dari sini.
In January 2015 one Malaysian ringgit is worth nearly 3,500 Indonesian Rupiah!


Lesson 38 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
window jendela tingkap


Lesson 39 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
He is saving money to buy a new car. Dia simpan uang untuk beli mobil baru. Dia simpan wang untuk beli kereta baru.
important penting mustahak


Lesson 40 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
Which pen is yours? Yang mana pena anda? Yang mana pen anda?
Where is my pen? Di mana pena aku? Di mana pen saya?


Lesson 41 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
I wish to talk with Mr. Ahmad. Saya hendak berbicara dengan Bapak Ahmad. Saya hendak bercakap dengan Encik Ahmad.
meeting pertemuan mesyuarat
parents orang tua ibu bapa
He is still living with his parents. Dia masih tinggal bersama orang tuanya. Dia masih tinggal dengan ibu bapanya.


Lesson 42 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
I want to buy shoes. Saya hendak beli sepatu. Saya hendak beli kasut.
necktie dasi tali leher
shopping complex (mall) pusat pertokoan, pusat perbelanjaan pusat membeli-belah
to go shopping berbelanja pergi membeli-belah
His wife likes to go shopping. Istrinya suka berbelanja. Isterinya suka pergi membeli-belah.
shoe shop toko sepatu kedai kasut
belt ikat pinggang tali pinggang
trousers celana panjang seluar panjang
He always wears a white shirt and tie to office. Dia selalu pakai kemeja putih dan dasi ke kantor. Dia selalu pakai kemeja putih dan tali leher ke pejabat.
I wear new shoes for my elder brother's wedding. Saya pakai sepatu baru untuk perkawinan kakak lelaki saya. Saya pakai kasut baru untuk perkahwinan abang saya.
break down, damaged rusak rosak
My car has broken down. Mobil aku sudah rusak. Kereta saya sudah rosak.


Lesson 43 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
taxi taksi teksi
taxi-driver sopir/supir taksi pemandu teksi
taxi fare tarif taksi tambang teksi
a fixed price harga pas (harga mati) harga tetap (harga mati)
money uang wang
food pangan makanan
While the official abbreviation for the Indonesian Rupiah is IDR eg. 100 MYR (ringgit) = 350,000 IDR, for everyday purposes it is simply written as Rp 350,000.


Lesson 44 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
doctor dokter doktor
What do you want to buy, sir? Mau beli apa, pak? Mau beli apa, encik?
When can we eat together? Kapan bisa kita makan bersama? Bila boleh kita makan bersama?
Do you have a pen (or not)? Ada pena tak? Ada pen tak?


Lesson 45 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
icecream es krim aiskrim
He has been to my office. Dia pernah ke kantor aku. Dia pernah ke pejabat saya.
I want to go to Mr. Ali's house. Aku hendak pergi ke rumah Bapak Ali. Saya hendak pergi ke rumah Encik Ali.


Lesson 46 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
This letter comes from my friend. Surat ini datang daripada teman aku. Surat ini datang daripada kawan saya.
For whom are you buying the shoes? Anda beli sepatu untuk siapa? Anda beli kasut untuk siapa?
I am sending an email to my mother. Aku kirim email kepada ibu aku. Saya hantar e-mel kepada emak saya.
I have to repeat again that often, when a word is put under Indonesian it does not mean that that word is not also used in Malaysia. It simply means that that word is more popularly used in Indonesia than in Malaysia, that's all. So ibu is as much used as emak in Malaysia for "mother". The same goes for kirim which is as much used as hantar in Malaysia for "sending" a letter or email. Just as aku is as much used as saya in Malaysia - but you know this already!


Lesson 47 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
easy (simple) gampang senang
happy senang gembira
interesting menarik seronok
cold dingin sejuk
ugly buruk, jelek hodoh
That job is easy. Kerja itu gampang. Kerja itu senang.
meaning arti erti
news kabar khabar
policeman polisi polis
return kembali balik
tired capek penat
wrong keliru salah
As you can see, in almost all cases, the same adjectives are used in Malaysia and Indonesia and where there are differences, they are not that important.


Lesson 48 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
marry kawin kahwin
understand paham faham
Can you speak English? Anda bisa bicara bahasa Inggris? Anda boleh cakap bahasa Inggeris?
No, I can't speak English. Tidak, saya tidak bisa bicara bahasa Inggris. Tidak, saya tidak boleh cakap bahasa Inggeris.
lottery lotere loteri
taxi-driver sopir/supir taksi pemandu teksi
police polisi polis
cancer kanker barah, kanser


Lesson 49 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
sandwich roti lapis sandwic
With the common spelling between Malaysia and Indonesia that came into being in 1972, pronunciation has become the least important aspect for someone who has studied Malay to speak Indonesian. This does not mean that there are no differences of course. But a student of Malay will not really need to re-adapt his pronunciation when he speaks Indonesian. Just speak the Malay you have learnt and your Indonesian interlocutor will most likely be able to understand you. But then even for Malay itself there is no ONE standard pronunciation, for the Malay spoken in East Malaysia is slightly different from the Malay spoken in West Malaysia while even the Malay spoken in Penang is slightly different from the Malay spoken in Kelantan - and yet both of these States are in West Malaysia.
Note what is mentioned in para 4 above though. The Indonesians always roll their r's.


Lesson 50 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
cake kue kuih


Lesson 51 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
Is that your car? No, it isn't my car. Itu mobil anda? Bukan, itu bukan mobil aku. Itu kereta anda? Bukan, itu bukan kereta saya.
He is not a Malaysian, he is a Japanese. Dia bukan orang Malaysia, dia orang Jepang. Dia bukan orang Malaysia, dia orang Jepun.
bag tas beg
He didn't take my bag. Dia tidak ambil tas saya. Dia tidak ambil beg saya.
This is your pen, isn't it? Ini pena anda, bukan? Ini pen anda, bukan?
This is the first time I come to Malaysia. Ini pertama kali saya datang ke Malaysia. Ini kali pertama saya datang ke Malaysia.


Lesson 52 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
a bachelor bujangan bujang
He is already 40 but is still a bachelor. Dia sudah berumur 40 tahun tetapi masih bujangan. Dia sudah berumur 40 tahun tetapi masih bujang.
My elder brother is already 50 but is still unmarried. Kakak lelaki saya sudah berumur 50 tahun tetapi belum menikah lagi. Abang saya sudah berumur 50 tahun tetapi belum berkahwin lagi.
(elderly) spinster perawan tua anak dara tua (andartu)
He is married. Dia sudah menikah. Dia sudah berkahwin.
I thought he had left but he is still in the house. Saya pikir dia sudah keluar tetapi dia masih ada di rumah. Saya ingat dia sudah keluar tetapi dia masih ada di rumah.


Lesson 53 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
I have already visited Paris. Aku telah mengunjungi Paris Saya pernah melawat ke Paris.
a company perusahaan syarikat
United States of America Amerika Serikat Amerika Syarikat
snow salju salji
Again as I have pointed out several times already, owing to linguistic influences that one country has over the other (and in both directions), what is given as the Indonesian version above is also intelligible in Malaysia and vice versa.


Lesson 54 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
Where do you stay? Anda tinggal di mana? Anda duduk di mana?


Lesson 55 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
marry kawin kahwin
medicine obat ubat
doctor dokter doktor
to return to one's hometown mudik balik kampung


Lesson 56 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
policeman polisi mata-mata
detective detektif/reserse/polisi rahasia mata-mata gelap
necktie dasi tali leher
spectacles kacamata cermin mata
toothpaste pasta gigi ubat gigi
staff staf kakitangan
a drinker (of alcohol) peminum kaki minum


Lesson 57 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
toothpaste pasta gigi ubat gigi
I want to see a doctor. Aku hendak jumpa dokter. Saya hendak jumpa doktor.
yesterday kemarin kelmarin
diarrhoea diare/mencret cirit-birit
flu flu/selesma/pilek demam selesema
healthy sehat sihat
to faint (jatuh) pingsan (jatuh) pengsan
medicine obat ubat
to see lihat, nampak lihat, tampak


Lesson 58 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
My car is bigger than his. Mobil saya lebih besar daripada mobilnya. Kereta saya lebih besar daripada keretanya.
These shoes are more expensive than those. Sepatu ini lebih mahal daripada sepatu itu. Kasut ini lebih mahal daripada kasut itu.
Bahasa Malaysia is easier than French. Bahasa Malaysia lebih mudah daripada Bahasa Perancis. Bahasa Malaysia lebih senang daripada Bahasa Perancis.
Note that while senang is frequently used in Malaysia for "simple" or "easy", the word has a different meaning altogether in Indonesia. There it means "happy" or "contented". The Indonesians use mudah or gampang when they want to say that something is "easy" or "simple" (though mudah is equally used in Malaysia). But to say that something is "difficult", both countries use either susah, sukar or sulit. You have three words to choose from and anyone of them will be understood whether you are in Malaysia or Indonesia.


Lesson 59 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
cook juru masak tukang masak
barber tukang cukur tukang rambut
nurse perawat jururawat
spokesperson juru bicara jurucakap
taxidriver sopir taksi pemandu teksi
secretary sekretaris setiausaha
blacksmith pandai besi tukang besi
photographer tukang foto tukang gambar
plumber tukang ledeng tukang paip
cobbler tukang sepatu tukang kasut
masseur/masseuse tukang pijat tukang urut
pilot penerbang juruterbang
typist juru ketik jurutaip
cashier kasir juruwang
engineer insinyur jurutera
stenographer juru steno jurutrengkas
announcer penyiar juruhebah
salesperson pelayan toko jurujual
coach pelatih jurulatih
accountant akuntan akauntan
electrician tukang listrik juruelektrik
manager manajer pengurus
translator penerjemah penterjemah
lecturer dosen pensyarah
businessman pedagang peniaga
editor redaktur pengarang
director direktur pengarah
receptionist resepsionis penyambut
actor aktor pelakon
headmaster kepala sekolah guru besar
soldier serdadu, laskar askar
policeman polisi polis, mata-mata
lawyer pengacara, advokat peguam
clerk juru tulis kerani
architect arsitek arkitek
servant babu, pramuwisma, pembantu orang gaji
As you would have noticed, there are quite a number of differences for the names of various occupations between Bahasa Malaysia and Indonesian. Earlier on you must have noticed that there were very few differences between the two languages when it comes to adjectives.


Lesson 60 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
three cars tiga buah mobil tiga buah kereta
to smoke merokok menghisap
He has got two cars. Dia ada dua buah mobil. Dia ada dua buah kereta.
My neighbour has two cats. Tetangga saya ada dua ekor kucing. Jiran saya ada dua ekor kucing.


Lesson 61 of Basic Malay Language Course.
ENGLISH INDONESIAN MALAY
aeroplane pesawat terbang kapal terbang
(electric) bulb bola lampu mentol lampu
envelope amplop sampul surat
medicine obat ubat
money uang wang
newspaper koran surat khabar
rabbit kelinci arnab
rubbish bin tempat sampah tong sampah
shoes sepatu kasut
spectacles kacamata cermin mata
telephone telepon telefon
necktie dasi tali leher
tree pohon pokok
watermelon semangka tembikai
window jendela tingkap


Vocabulary Peculiar to Indonesian

Here are some common Indonesian words that are completely different from Malay so you might as well learn them off by heart from the very beginning if you intend to speak Indonesian!







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Its flexibility in creating new words can be seen in the word "kudeta", the Indonesian word for "coup d'état" created entirely from its pronunciation alone! Talking about ingenuity...
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Note 1: You can simply say Maaf or its full form Maafkan saya when you have to interrupt a person (as when asking him a question) or when you have to pass before him (but the Indonesians are more likely to say Permisi in such a case).
Note 2: The use of Apa as a question indicator (see sentences 14 and 19 above) is strictly an Indonesian phenomenon. When Malaysians use Apa you can always translate it as "What".

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This course is copyrighted. It is not to be reproduced without permission from http://pgoh13.com

INDONESIAN DICTIONARY: In case you are looking for a good Indonesian dictionary I can recommend the Tuttle Concise Indonesian-English/English-Indonesian Dictionary. It's not too expensive, not bulky despite its 700 pages and it's recent (2014 edition). It can also be delivered anywhere in the world in hardly a month. Here is an extract from its introduction to the Indonesian language which I find interesting:
Indonesian acts as a unifying force among speakers of around 750 regional dialects across the archipelago. Indonesian is also understood in Singapore and Malaysia, as it is mutually intelligible with Malay, thus making it one of the major languages of Southeast Asia...Its ability to absorb new influences yet repackage them in a typically Indonesian way makes it highly dynamic in its interaction with other languages, both local, foreign, dead and living, but also susceptible to regional variation and inclined to inconsistency, particularly in spellings of borrowed words.